Welcome to Hironori and Nils

A very warm welcome to two new lab members.  Hironori joins us on a Japanese Uehara Foundation scholarship to work on dopamine and decision making over the next year.  Nils is doing a 3-month rotation in the lab as part of his MSc Neuroscience course, working with Xudong to continue investigating how rats learn structure and how this is represented neurally.

Walton Lab do Brain Diaries Demos

The Walton Lab was out in force on Saturday as part of the Brain Diaries exhibition at the Natural History Museum in Oxford.  Visitors got to play a "Dopamine Dipper" marbles game to learn about prediction errors, and experienced a "Heavy Feet Challenge" as a platform to discuss how dopamine influences motivation, effort and decision making.  Most importantly, all attendees were thoroughly disabused of any ideas from the media that dopamine is necessary for pleasure and happiness.

Congratulations, Clio!

Many congratulations to soon-to-be Dr Clio who successfully defended her D.Phil thesis on the role of different clearance mechanisms on patterns of dopamine release and motivated behaviours!

Welcome to Iñes, Sebastian and Veronika

A very warm welcome to a cornucopia of talented MSc students rotating with the lab for the first 3 months of the year.  Iñes is working with Xudong and Cheng to see how rats build models of the world, Sebastian is investigating the pharmacology of self-control in rats with help from Laura, and Veronika is looking at glutamate-dopamine interactions during habituation in mice with Marios and Tom JP. 

Welcome to Emilie!

We are delighted welcome to Emilie Werlen who has joined the lab as a post-doctoral fellow.  Emilie recently finished a PhD with Dr Matt Jones at the University of Bristol where she focused on the influence of mesocortical dopamine projections on neural activity patterns in different brain states and cognition.  In Oxford, she will be working on analyses of electrochemical data and leading a project to determine the precise temporal relationship between dopamine release and action initiation.

1st post-doc advert now live

Applications are now live for a highly motivated postdoctoral research associate to take forward a new 5-year Wellcome Trust-funded project to investigate the precise causal role of dopamine release in the regulation of reward-guided action selection.  The post is initially a 3-year fixed-term appointment with the possibility of renewal up 5 years, with a start date of 1 November 2016 (or as soon as possible thereafter).  Closing date is 7th October, 2016.

The primary role of the researcher will be to take forward and develop a programme of work aimed at unravelling the moment-by-moment role of dopamine release in decisions to act or not to act. To do this, the project will use state-of-the-art techniques to record and/or manipulate sub-second dopamine in rodents performing sophisticated reward-guided decision making tasks. There will also be the potential to use computational modelling to better understand the relationship between real-time dopamine release and animals’ behaviour.

Candidates should have attained, or be nearing completion of a PhD in a relevant discipline and/or have relevant postdoctoral experience.  Experience with rodent neurosurgery, in vivo recording and/or optogenetic tools (preferably in behaving rodents) is essential along with excellent organisational and record keeping skills.

Informal enquiries to Mark are encouraged.  More details and formal applications can be found here and on the central Oxford recruitment portal here (job ref: 125281).  One other similar position will also come available in the next 6-12 months.

New post-doc positions

Following the award of Mark's SRF, 1-2 new post-doc positions will be opening up shortly.  We'll be looking for talented people with experience of using optogenetics, chemogenetics and physiological recording to understand reward-guided behaviours.  Any interested candidates should first email me directly.

Core funding renewed!

The lab's core funding has been renewed following the award of a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellowship to Mark.  The project will investigate the role of dopamine in regulating action initiation and self-control, using combinations of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, optogenetics, chemogenetics and calcium imaging.